IN PHOTOS: Book lovers found respite at Komura; book fair


Warehouse Eight together with Kwago organized the first experience-driven book fair that features different ways to tell a story on November 18, 2017 in Makati City. Komura; Book Fair was also supported by the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP).

With an aim to be a literary respite, an escape from reality, Komura; focused on letting people experience storytelling in a wide variety of forms–through virtual reality, music, open theater, independent publishing, and more–and on giving bookworms an avenue to meet other book lovers and enthusiasts. The word “komura” came from Haruki Murakami’s Kafka on the Shore, where it was a fictional memorial library that the protagonist lived in.

“We wanted to design a fair that would not only be a treat for our guests, but also for our vendors. We want everyone to have a good time,” Komura; co-founder and Warehouse Eight co-owner Kayla Dionisio shared.

“We wanted everyone to feel at home. And I’m so happy to see that they did. I even saw a guy half-finishing a book he just bought that day. Children and old couples were reading in the nooks we intentionally scattered in the space. I really felt that Komura; revived a lost art form—reading,” she added.

Check out some of our photos from the event below:

Comics artist Hulyen at the booth of Haliya Publishing. Haliya Publishing is an independent komix publishing that aims to produce books that are “artist-centric, diverse in topic, intellectually arresting, and contractually fair”. Pauline Reyes/INQUIRER.net

 

Attendees learn how to play the “Darna at ang Nawawalang Bato” card game created by Marx Rulloda and Karlo Senga of Balangay Entertainment Inc. Pauline Reyes/INQUIRER.net

 

A booth by Chibot Media featured virtual reality equipment. Pauline Reyes/INQUIRER.net

 

Vintage and rare books were also available for purchase during the event. Pauline Reyes/INQUIRER.net

 

Ourselves the Elves performed during the Echoes at the Warehouse, a busking session where musicians could share their stories. Pauline Reyes/INQUIRER.net

 

Magpies, a Laguna-based collective that “explores independent publishing, performed poetry, visual media, and other alternative art forms”, sold copies of their satirical “Los BaNews”. Pauline Reyes/INQUIRER.net